Remember Betelgeuse? The red giant star named Betelgeuse, over in the constellation Orion? Remember a year ago when astronomers thought Betelgeuse was about to go supernova?

My Hubble Abode

A few months ago, well actually almost a year ago, astronomers studying Betelgeuse noticed some major dimming in the star, and the news spread like wildfire!

The issue arised when in 2019 astronomers observed dramatic dimming in the Southern part of the star, making it about 3 x fainter! With Betelgeuse being an enormous red supergiant we know its days left are few, so many thought extreme dimming meant the star is about to go supernova!

This comparison image shows the star Betelgeuse before and after its unprecedented dimming. The observations, taken with the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope in January and December 2019, show how much the star has faded and how its apparent shape has changed. Credit: ESO/Montargès et al.

So what caused the dimming?

A large group of astronomers lead by Andrea Dupree from multiple observatories have gathered evidence to suggest that the reason behind…

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2 responses »

  1. Kieran Paul says:

    The galaxy is an interesting place. This reminds me of my 10th blog post the Vega Star system which I expounded way back when. What took millions of years to create has descended into dust and darkness after a massive collision and explosion. I guess you never know whats round the corner. Our own sun and moon have protected earth from countless events we’ll never really know.

    Liked by 1 person

    • J.S. Pailly says:

      I have a real soft spot for Vega. It’s one of the first stars I look for in the night sky. As I understand it, Vega has a relatively short amount of life left too, though it’s still got much more time than Betelgeuse does.

      Like

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