Welcome to a special A to Z Challenge edition of Sciency Words!  Sciency Words is an ongoing series here on Planet Pailly about the definitions and etymologies of science or science-related terms.  In today’s post, H is for:

HYDROTHERMAL VENTS

In his book All These Worlds Are Yours, Canadian astronomer Jon Willis recounts the story of how hydrothermal (hot water) vents were first discovered here on Earth.  It was 1977.  A scientific research vessel was towing a deep-sea probe along the ocean floor in the Pacific when the probe detected a temperature anomaly.

This was exactly what the crew of that research vessel was hoping to find: a sort of underwater volcano, right where two tectonic plates were moving apart.  But the real surprise came when that research team brought their deep-sea probe back to the surface and developed all its photographs.  They saw the hydrothermal vent they were expecting to see, but they also saw things living—yes, living!—all around it.

Marine microbiologist Holger Jannasch, who was part of a follow-up expedition in 1979, had this to say:

We were struck by the thought, and its fundamental implications, that here solar energy, which is so prevalent in running life on our planet, appears to be largely replaced by terrestrial energy—chemolithoautotrophic bacteria taking over the role of green plants.  This was a powerful new concept and, in my mind, one of the major biological discoveries of the 20th Century.

It’s become fashionable to suppose that, rather than the “warm little pond” that Charles Darwin once wrote about, perhaps life began its conquest of Earth in an environment like this: a place deep under water where heat and chemicals come spewing up out of the planet’s crust.

An Introduction to Astrobiology actually cites science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke as the first to realize what all this might mean for life in our Solar System.  Specifically, Clarke thought of the icy moons of Jupiter.  In his 2001: A Space Odyssey novels, Clarke tells us of a hydrothermal vent on Europa—a “warm oasis” populated by plant-like, slug-like, and crab-like creatures.

The idea of life on Europa (or Saturn’s moon Enceladus) clustered around hydrothermal vents may have started out as science fiction, but it is now a possibility that astrobiologists take very seriously. But we’ll talk about that later this week.     

Next time on Sciency Words A to Z, what’s wrong with the I in SETI

10 responses »

  1. very interesting. where was this underwater volcano? would love to see those photos.

    Joy at The Joyous Living

    Like

  2. maybe the extremophiles aren’t so extreme after all

    Liked by 1 person

    • J.S. Pailly says:

      Maybe so! Of course what’s extreme is relative. We’ve adapted to an environment full of a very strong oxidizing gas. That must seem pretty “extreme” to all the bacteria living around those hydrothermal vents!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. On powerful new concepts, I think it alerts us to the fact that when looking for life, we should look for energy gradients in general (along with the right environment for chemistry of some type to happen).

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Another great graphic! Well done….I’m enjoying these even if I don’t comment on them all.

    DB McNicol, author
    Microfiction: Hen

    Liked by 1 person

    • J.S. Pailly says:

      Thank you so much! This might be my favorite drawing for A to Z, though there are still plenty of letters left in the alphabet, so we’ll see. And no worries about commenting. I’m having a tough time keeping up with everybody’s A to Z posts myself.

      Like

  5. Sourena says:

    The place on enceladus: the south pole

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to SelfAwarePatterns Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.